Morrissey “L’insoumis” – Nicolas Sauvage (Camion Blanc)

Alors que la plupart des artistes pop cherchent à plaire au plus grand nombre sans jamais faire la moindre vague, Morrissey a toujours manié l’art de la provocation, de l’ambiguïté et du paradoxe avec brio réussissant ainsi au fil des années à attirer autant de fans que de détracteurs. Il existe même un club d’ “ex-fans”! Le titre du livre de Nicolas Sauvage semble alors pleinement justifié même si ces 600 et quelques pages s’attardent beaucoup moins sur les scandales et sur la vie personnelle du dandy vegan mancunien que sur son imposante carrière. Chaque album y est disséqué dans les moindres détails (un gros manque dans l’autobiographie parue en 2013!), les dates y sont précises, les différents line-ups étudiés à la loupe et les citations toujours bien choisies.

La fascination du personnage pour le glam rock y est aussi largement abordée, que ce soit en ce qui concerne la fameuse légende du fan club des NEW YORK DOLLS jusqu’à leur reformation (dont Morrissey est à l’origine), son amour de T-REX, BOWIE, SPARKS et du très sous-estimé JOBRIATH, mais aussi sa collaboration avec le regretté Mick Ronson.

L’auteur avoue : “Ecrire sur Morrissey est un exercice délicat. Plus qu’avec d’autres artistes, on s’autorise à être parfois sentencieux et à se montrer systématiquement exigeant. Cette exigence, c’est Morrissey lui-même qui l’a imposée par une règle fixée tacitement.” C’est cette exigence d’une précision chirurgicale qu’on ressent tout au long de cette lecture qui réussi tout de même à tempérer certains propos du chanteur sans forcément les excuser.

Fruit d’un travail de recherche impressionnant et d’une passion entretenue de longue date, cet ouvrage vous apprendra forcément quelquechose sur The SMITHS (mais bien entendu pas la date d’une hypothétique reformation !) ou sur la carrière solo de Steven Patrick Morrissey que vous soyez fan hardcore ou juste amateur de quelques albums. Ce livre vient également enfin combler un manque évident dans la littérature pop en France. /Laurent C.

Bad Losers – Paris Dolls!

France has never been the best place for glam rock’n’roll but there were a few jewel bands in the past. Some of you might think of The FRENCHIES in the 70s or bands like TEARS and TEASIN’ BABES in the early 90s but the best French glam band in the mid-80s was undoubtedly BAD LOSERS. Twisted Soul Records has just reissued the band’s album enriched with some great bonus material and a 4 song vinyl EP for Record Store Day on June 12th. Guitarist Mister T.Jones answered our questions…

Can you tell us a bit about the history of BAD LOSERS?

As far as I’m concerned, the story started in 1983 when I joined the band in Paris. BAD LOSERS was originally a garage rock punk band from Toulon (Var) that had explored most of their local scene.

Did you have a precise idea of how you wanted to sound and look from the start ?

It was clear to me as a guitar player that I wanted to play in the spirit of the bands that had influenced me such as The ROLLING STONES , T.REX,the NEW YORK DOLLS and all the band we used to listen to like The GUN CLUB or The ONLY ONES. Since BAD LOSERS wanted to head in that direction, we quickly got along well. The way we looked developped as years went by just like our haircuts! (Laughs)

You recorded the album in London in 1985. How did that happen? How were the recording sessions ? Any anecdotes ?

We recorded the LP in August 1985, we had just signed a record deal with Parisian record label GMG. We wanted to record it with Peter Perett (The ONLY ONES) who had worked with bands we used to like such as WASTED YOUTH (with some future members of FLESH FOR LULU) but the record label decided to send us to Dave Goodman who was the live sound engineer of The SEX PISTOLS and who recorded their songs before “Nevermind The Bollocks”.
Dave was great to us as a producer, always listening to what we had to say, from our arrangement ideas to the production ones. We wanted to have female backing vocals and sitar on one of the songs (“Evil Sacrifices”) and he played it himself. He even went and record traffic jams on Oxford Street (that can be heard as the intro of “On Main Street“.) We recorded 8 songs in 5 days (mix included.) The mastering was made at world famous Abbey Road Studios.

There was The DOGS D’AMOUR and HANOÏ ROCKS among others at that time in London. Did you ever think of relocating there just like HANOÏ did?

We met The DOGS D’AMOUR in Paris before the became a well-known band, we felt really close to the way they played rock’n’roll live as well as the way they looked, the glam image we also had here in France. We wanted to move to London but a few things hold us back in France. On the other hand we really thought of being the French glam band in London.
In late 1986 they sent us Ian Grant who played with GUNSLINGERS. We were HANOÏ ROCKS fans because they were one of the rare European bands playing so tight and so loud at that time, their Marquee show is just timelessly killer!

(Copyrights Richard Gillet)

Were you feeling close to any other French bands?

We were friends with WILD CHILD and a few other bands we happened to play with like The JET BOYS but honestly we were the only band with such a glam image playing NEW YORK DOLLS kind of rock’n’roll in those days. Most French bands at that time were part of the “alternative punk” scene/movement.

Johnny Thunders and Stiv Bators were also in Paris in those days. We can hear Stiv sing “Honky Tonk Women” with you on the CD. Did you happen to share a stage more than once?

Unfortunately not! It was the only good occasion to share a stage together. I think I saw Johnny Thunders at least 10 times when he was in Paris whether it was for solo gigs or with Henri Paul Cosa Nostra or The HEARTBREAKERS. As far as Stiv is concerned, it was a great surprise to play with him! We were invited to play as Johnny Thunders’ backing band at the New Moon in Paris and once we got in, the promoter told us that Stiv Bators would also be there!
During the first part of the night Johnny was playing with only BAD LOSERS’ rhythm section and his friend Henri Paul Tortosa while I had prepared cover song list that we used with Stiv for the second part of the night.

It was memorable and so unique to hear Stiv sing a ROLLING STONES song and even a HEARTBREAKERS song we knew by heart. You can listen to the “Honky Tonk Women” cover with Stiv on vocals on the “Southern Style” CD.

There was several line-up changes in the band. Wasn’t it too difficult to find people who could fit considering your style?

It was indeed very difficult to find a guitar player who could match with our tastes and needs.
I found Jean-Paul (N’Diago Pop) who played on the album and who was a 60s/70s ROLLING STONES fan just like me and a really good guitar player when it comes to play Chuck Berry/famous bluesmen kind of guitar chords.

There were various reasons for these line-up changes and usually personal ones. Jean-Paul went and toured in England, Ian who then played with us had the right image for us and so did Phil. The other ones were either shooting stars in BAD LOSERS or just out of control! (Laughs)

A band like HANOÏ ROCKS kinda suffered from being caught in between several music styles, “too glam for punks”, “too punk for hard rockers”, etc. Did you feel the same thing with BAD LOSERS?

Totally! We were a rock’n’roll band before all and in the middle of the 80s, it was all about the “alternative punk scene singing in French (for most of them)” in France.
BAD LOSERS had several sides, a punk rock side but also a lot of 70s influences. Alike the NEW YORK DOLLS or HANOÏ ROCKS, I don’t think we can use the word “hard rock” to describe us even though we could think about it nowadays mainly because of the way we looked.

“Southern Style” will be out on June 12h. This EP was also recorded in London. How come it wasn’t released back in the day?

These 4 original songs were supposed to be included on a second album that was never released.
We shopped for record labels to get a better the deal so that the band could get bigger. Major labels were asking us to sing in French and we refused because our music style was purely Anglo-saxon. Then we had some line-up changes and desires for a different music for some of us. We got tired of it and the band broke up in 1988.

Both CD and vinyl EP are released by Twisted Soul Records. How did that happen?

We’ve had this project for a long time. We had to wait until the birth of the record label and their start as a professional company. We also had to dig for files like this 1985 “Waiting For The Man” (VELVET UNDERGROUND) cover which was a demo with Richard, a great guitarist from Toulon who unfortunately couldn’t stay in the band. Same thing with our MOTT THE HOOPLE cover “One Of The Boys” recorded live at the Gibus Club when we opened for The CHERRY BOMBZ (Nasty Suicide introduced the band onstage with us before we started playing) or the song with Stiv Bators.

How did the band break up? Was it a brutal stop or was it more a long-run thing?

It was more a long-run thing for several various reasons and a desire to do other things. Also because it was a bit hard to see our future as BAD LOSERS at the end of the 80s in France.

Do you think the band would have explored other music territories if you didn’t split? On the EP we can feel a will to try new things and sounds, a bit like The LORDS OF THE NEW CHURCH or when The DAMNED released “Phantasmagoria”…

The style of these four unreleased songs is a bit different especially in their arrangements. We wanted to have a brass section and a boogie piano for the pure rock’n’roll “Southern Style”, but also some orchestral arrangements for the ballad “Girl In Uniform.” There’s also “Century Jane”, a 70s rock song and another song that can bring The LORDS OF THE NEW CHURCH or The DAMNED (when they experimented with darker influences) to mind indeed.

After the band’s split you went and explored new musical horizons. Can you tell us about it?

At the end of BAD LOSERS I bought a Home Studio which was a very new thing in those days. Bass, drums, everything was in! (Laughs), then I wrote music for advertisements/commercials before forming an electronic music duo that allowed me to travel and play in many different countries. The band (MOOG SPECTRAL) still exists to this day. In the 00s, I got back to my guitar and started a band called The JONES. We played as a backing band for Chris Wilson (FLAMIN’ GROOVIES) or Willie “Loco” Alexander.

I’m also part of an electro-rock project with Holeg Spies, we have some releases out on a British record label and a song remixed by Youth (bassplayer in KILLING JOKE.) I also work on songs at home. They’ll be released this year…

Did you ever think about a BAD LOSERS live reunion?

Honestly it’s almost impossible to get the band back as it used to be in those days full of music, fun and rock’n’roll!!! But this Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/BadLosers) as well as the quality of this reissue with 4 unreleased songs, live material, a demo, a poster and beautiful words from Patrick Eudeline almost make me want to play some good old BAD LOSERS rock’n’roll riffs.

Buy from Disques Dom-Forlane

Richard Duguay “Bad JuJu”

Just one look at the cover makes you think that L.A rock’n’roller RICHARD DUGUAY has his own universe, which is a positive thing to start on. Opening song “Death Defy” is a mix of 70s and 80s hard rock and is the perfect anthem to make the listener ready for the rest of the album. Then “The Rain” brings early ALICE COOPER and psychedelia to mind, and songs like “Psychotic Garden” or “Bad Ju Ju” also head to the same direction, while a song like “Dr. Silver” has a bit of a ZODIAC MINDWARP vibe. Things get a bit more experimental with “The Last Star”, but still with a good dose of rock’n’roll, and “Critical… Darling”, “Paradise Is Gone” or “Way Back Home” could be unreleased ALICE COOPER songs.
Listening to this album bring images of big shows or even musicals at time. This could give another dimension to these songs, but even without that, you should definitely check this album out! /Laurent C.

richardduguay.com
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The Brothers Steve – Megaliftic Pop!

3 members of TSAR have formed The BROTHERS STEVE, a glammy powerpop band with strong 60s influences and great vocal harmonies. They tell us about the band, the recording of the album, their favourite records and much more !

How did you get the idea of starting The BROTHERS STEVE?

Jeff Whalen:  We all knew each other from our schoolboy days at UC Santa Barbara, home of the Avo Taco, which was this amazing taco at this place called Freebird’s.  Somebody told me that they don’t make it anymore.

Os Tyler: Yeah, I actually went to Freebird’s a little while back and ordered an Avo Taco and the guy behind the counter’s eyes lit up like a fond distant memory was washing over him and he said, “Wow, it’s like you just came in from outer space.”

JW:  I miss the Avo Taco.  Anyway, but yeah, last summer some friends were throwing a party and they needed a band, so we said let’s do it!  The Brothers Steve!

OT: Yeah, it was that or hire a choir of rubber chickens.

Did you get to find the good line-up easily?

JW:  Sure!  It was automatic.  I love these guys.  And playing with them is a major gas.  It’s just super-gassy.  I mean, we’ve been super-good friends since college—Jeff and Coulter and I are in Tsar, Dylan is like my bro life-partner, and Os is my favorite guy to write songs with, out of anybody on the planet.

OT: Ah, man, that’s too kind. Truth is I probably never would have written song one if it wasn’t for Jeff. I was walking past a window one day and this guy says, “Hey Os, you wanna hear the song we just wrote and recorded?” Turns out it was Jeff Whalen and Jeff Solomon, recording right out of their living room. It was an epiphany moment for me. It was honestly the first time that I realized that people write songs. They don’t magically materialize, people write them. And, well, I’m a people, so why not give it a try.

JW:  My grandma had a dog who thought he was a people.

How did you write the songs? Did you have them before the band got together?

JW:  When Os and I write together, mostly I come up with a chord progression and then Os starts riffing on some words and then we bang around some chorus ideas and then maybe get some lunch.  Os and I have pretty much been writing together this whole time.  We’ve always wanted to put out the songs on some kind of album-type band-situation-type thing, but we’ve been unable to, for whatever reason.  Mostly I think because, left to our own devices, we just keep recording and re-recording and thinking about it and talking about it and never finishing anything.  We have a buncha-buncha songs, so this is cool to be in the Brothers Steve and be able to play and sing them in a thing where we have to finish it or people will get mad at us.

Can you tell us about the recording of the album?

JW:  We tried to record it really fast—like three or four days—mostly to keep Os and me from recording more and more vocals and dragging the process on, potentially for years.  So we finished tracking, and what we had was cool, for sure.  But it wasn’t done-done—the band had a couple pick-up things we needed to do to finish up, maybe another day or two, max.  So, secretly, Os and I took the sessions to his house and recorded more and more vocals without telling anyone.  I remember feeling kind of anxious about it, like everybody’s gonna be pissed that we got all overdubby on it.  But we did our level best to do it with … you know, alacrity.  We got Dylan in on it, to sing more, too, which was great, because I love how we sound, the three of us together.  In the end, I’d say we only dragged the process on an extra month or two.


There’s a lot of vocal harmonies on the album. Is this something you miss in modern music?

JW:  I think I do, now that you mention it.  I’ve been listening to a lot of sunshine pop these days, from the late 60’s/early 70’s, and it’s clear that big harmonies and lots of singing was so important to those guys.

OT: I generally love music of all types but I feel like any song can be enhanced and uplifted by adding human vocal harmonies. There’s no way to replicate an individual human voice, and mixing two or three of them together in harmony gives you this compounded unique-tacity that’s megaliftic.

JW:  Well said.  This is why it takes us years to finish a demo.

What is « Beat Generation Poet Turned Assassin » about?

OT: “Beat Generation Poet” is a biographical sketch of a young man named Bociferous Dillard. Dillard was a little younger than Burroughs and a little older than Ginsberg. He was a cutting edge poet, early to the beat generation scene, and initial assessments suggested he would embody a cultural milestone, and that his poetry would be remembered for eternity.

However, as the now-known voices of establishment Beat Gen society redefined and pushed the movement in the direction that it ultimately embraced, the early critical acclaim of Dillard’s groundbreaking stylistic finesse degenerated to critical disparagement, leading Dillard to utter disillusion and despair.

In his mid-twenties, Dillard began hiring himself out as a contracted killer. Known to have assassinated at least seven men, he would never write another word until his death at age 27. He died beside his last victim, banking mogul Victor Lanchot. Bociferous Dillard’s dying words, scrawled in blue ink on a two-dollar bill: “Your words, not mine.”

JW:  I didn’t know any of that.

The 60s and indie influences are obvious, but since you also play in TSAR, we can hear a few similarities in the glammier songs like « We Got The Hits », « Carolanne » or even « She » do you think some of these songs could have been released by TSAR?

JW:  “We Got the Hits” could be Tsar-ified for sure.  “Carolanne” could probably be on a later Tsar album?  Like one in an alternate timeline, maybe?  An alternate timeline in which the four members simultaneously released solo records, a la KISS?  And the posters all fit together?  And there was only like three or four good songs on all the albums put together?

Have The BROTHERS STEVE played a lot of shows so far?

JW:  No!  We played that party and then we played our album release party for International Pop Overthrow a couple months ago, and then a show last night in Burbank.

OT: We are excited to play more as the anticipation takes us!

Is there any new L.A. Bands you feel close to musicwise?

JW:  We’re friends with Punch Punch Kick—they played the International Pop Overthrow show with us—and they’re amazing.  Super hooky.

OT: I personally love United Ghosts. There are no pure parallel lines between us, but I just dig their thing. They just had a sweet summertime European tour. They’re worth checking out!

5 of your favourite albums and a few words about them.

JW:  Right now I’m listening to Begin by the Millennium at least once or twice a day.  People told me it was supposed to be so good, but the first few times I listened to it, I wasn’t all that knocked out.  I had the CD in my stereo for a while and I’d let it play kind of randomly while not really paying attention and then all of a sudden one day it kicked in.  Now I think it’s brilliant!  Kind of like the Association meets Nilsson meets Paul Williams or something.  Kind of like if Olivia Tremor Control was a polished sunshine pop band.  Or like an easy-listening MGMT.  Lots of vocal harmonies on that one.

OT: It’s a smooth sailing groove.

JW:  Also, check out the New Directions album by Gary Lewis and the Playboys.  You can kind of guarantee that any album called New Directions is going to be terrible, but it’s actually great.  It came out after all his hits, but I’d argue it’s his best album.  That is, if I could ever find anybody who wanted to argue “best Gary Lewis albums” with me.  I’m sure they’re out there.  The record’s full of these weirdly manipulative songs about a lonely guy trying to get girls to pay attention to him.  Solid record.  Gary Lewis is super underrated, I think.  And there’s something about his singing style—if you can call it that—that makes me feel 90’s-y.  Does anyone out there know what I’m talking about?  That kind of, I-know-I-can’t-really-sing-but-really-the-jokes-on-you-because-I’m-not-really-trying-although-I-really-am type of singing from the 90’s?

OT: I do!

JW:  I’ve also been jamming Too Fast For Love by Motley Crue.  Shout at the Devil‘s got some great songs on it, but Too Fast For Love is their masterpiece.  But how must it feel to be in this huge, internationally famous band that’s been around for decades and know that the best thing you ever did, by far, was essentially your demo tape?  Must make you feel like S.E. Hinton or something, writing The Outsiders when she was in high school.  If you hit your peak right out of the box—or before you’re even out of the box—what do you do the rest of your life?  Just Harper-Lee that shit?  Who knows?  Great album, though.  And check this out!  I never noticed—ever!—that the album cover photo is a blowup of Vince Neil’s crotch from the full length picture of him on the back cover.  Does everybody know that except me?  Have I just been walking around, talking to people, living my life and I’m the only one who didn’t know that?  I had always assumed it was a planned crotch shot, an intentional takeoff on Sticky Fingers, right?  I just noticed this like two weeks ago.

OK, that’s three.  Uh, four, let’s say the Xanadu soundtrack.  I’ve always been an ELO-side guy, but lately I’ve been more into the Olivia Newton-John side.  Her voice in that period has a kind of fragile clarity I’m digging.  The song “Dancin’”—the duet with the guy from the Tubes—is so ridiculous.  It’s almost like an experiment in ridiculousness.  Her innocence and his over-the-top, fake-confident lasciviousness, with the 40’s-music-meets-fake-hard-rock medley.  So charming, despite its obvious effort to be charming.

Os, you got a fifth?

OT:  Well yeah, here’s a top 5 album: OutKast’s Speakerboxxx/The Love Below.  Funky, groovy, funny, groomy.  Such great stuff.

JW:  Totally.  Os, have you ever considered “Hey Ya!” as a glam song?

OT:  Not really.  And another fun weird one while I’m thinking on it, The Flaming Lips’s Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots.  Feel good, swim and sway, fully instrumented tunes with plenty of echo-y, glorious harmony vocals.

What’s coming next for The BROTHERS STEVE and TSAR

JW:  The Brothers Steve have a Christmas single coming out on Big Stir records in November, which I’m mega-double jazzed about since I love Christmas music.  Christmas music is the Beatles of music, if you know what I mean.

OT:  Sure!

JW:  And then another full-length record, I’d say.  Right?

OT: If the planets align, I would love that!
JW:  As for Tsar … I dunno!  We talk about it, dream about it.  Just waiting for the right moment, you know, globally or whatever.

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The Brothers Steve “#1”

If you were into 00s powerpop/glam, then you probably remember Los Angeles band TSAR. If you don’t, then rush and grab their albums! 3 members of TSAR play in The BROTHERS STEVE, but the music of the band is more influenced by TEENAGE FANCLUB, GUIDED BY VOICES or The KINKS. The 60s powerpop influences perfectly mix with 90s altenative Brit pop in “Angeline” and some strong 70s glam rock influences can be heard in the very catchy “We Got The Hits” and in “Carry Me.”Songs like “She”, the organic “C’mon Pappy” or “Carolanne” are rooted in the 60s but manage to sound modern at the same time and The BROTHERS STEVE also display some garage rock’n’roll influences in “Songwriter” or in “Beat Generation Poets Turned Assassin.” Although this album doesn’t sound like TSAR, it definitely has some similarities in the songwriting, the bubblegum melodies and vocal harmonies, and I personally won’t complain about it.
That’s modern powerpop at its best, and the perfect summer album if you’re still looking for one! /Laurent C.

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Lipstick “S/T”

Introduced as a band that was formed after their lead singer and leader, Greg Troyan travelled through space, LIPSTICK is a theatrical glam influenced band from Nashville, TN. While you’ll find a good dose of L.A. glam metal in songs like “We’re Here To Rock You”, “The Conan Song” or “Alone”, LIPSTICK also brings 70s KISS, or the NEW YORK DOLLS to mind in “I Like The Way I Rock”, or “Having Fun.” The production is quite raw and sometimes reminds me of the early 90s Sunset Strip bands demos, which isn’t a bad thing to me, although a bubblegum rock, glitter pop song like “Tonight” would probably sound better with a bigger production.
While this album’s mood is definitely fun, LIPSTICK gets to surprise us with the last song, “I Want The World To Know”, a sad piano ballad that sounds way better than the typical power ballads you can hear on most glam metal revival bands nowadays.
LIPSTICK‘s colourful universe also seems to be connected to its members’ interest in anime, which probably makes them very Japanese friendly!
“Rock’n’Roll Forever” perfectly sums up the band’s spirit, and if you think that fun, fantasy and flamboyance have been missing for too long in music, then this album is for you./Laurent C.

http://www.lipstickgeneration.com/
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Warshow Angels “S/T”

WarshAngelsAny band mentioning T.REX and The LORDS OF THE NEW CHURCH in their biography is worth talking about, right? Well, good chances are you’ll hear about them on here!… Formed in NYC by Kneel Cohn (Vocals/Guitar) and Todd Bryerton (who played drums on the last CONSOLIDATED album) after recording a few songs in Manhattan, WARSHOW ANGELS offers us a very interesting and unexpected debut album full of special guests, mixing 70s glam sexiness to industrial/post-punk atmospheres.
“Bruises” and its SISTERS OF MERCY kind of bass played by Tony Barber (BUZZCOCKS) reminds me a bit of MARILYN MANSON‘s “Mechanical Animals” era, a retro-futuristic mood that can also be found in “Prozac Smile” and “Dive.” SIGUE SIGUE SPUTNIK synths and groovy Bolan-esque beats/guitars meet up in “This Is Not A (Hit Song)” (with HANOÏ ROCKS‘ Sam Yaffa on bass!), and LOVE AND ROCKETS often comes to mind while listening to this record. Other guests include Martin Shellard (SPIRITUALIZED) on the sci-fi ballad “Red Plastik Crush”, Peter Holmstrom (DANDY WARHOLS) on the spacey-psyche “Planet Girl” and Nicky Garratt (UK SUBS) on “Love Hz”, a dark sexy dancey electro-glam tune.
Beware! Songs like “Bang Bang Love”, “Sexy TV Trash” or the infectious “Flaunt It Like This” won’t leave your mind after listening to them a couple of times! (and since too much is neve renough, you’ll also get a “Flaunt It Like This” remix version à la SSS by Julian Beeston (NITZER EBB, PIGFACE) )… The 70s, the 80s and the future in one album, definitely the best surprise of these last months!/Laurent C.

http://www.warshowangels.com/
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Black Heart Breakers “S/T”

BHBreakersThese young Australian guys may look like they are in a 80s influenced sleaze rock band from Sweden, but their music has more to do with the BOYS, BITERS or the EXPLODING HEARTS… Teenage vocals, 70s rock’n’roll guitar riffs, poppy backing vocals (in a BEACH BOYS way), and the occasional THIN LIZZY influenced guitar solo, you’ll find all the ingredients you need to get a cool contemporary glammy power pop band.
You’ll get a bit of T.REX in “Don’t Worry About Me”, some RAMONES in “I Wanna Be Wanted”, and a bit of UNDERTONES in “Pretender”, no need to say that these kids have good music tastes!
Bringing youth back in rock’n’roll, a song like “Seventeen” will make you think that BLACK HEART BREAKERS should already be sharing stages with The STRYPES. This self-produced album is now just waiting for you to listen to it!/Laurent C.

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